REVIEW: DESOLATION ROW, BY KAY KENDALL

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It was autumn in 1968 when their friend from the draft resister’s group was murdered in a church, the very place where they were supposed to gather for a meeting. The others had left, but Reg Simpson had gone back for his jacket. And that is when it happened.

David and Austin Starr had relocated to Toronto when they began to fear that David would soon be drafted. Not willing to actually dodge the draft, the two of them transferred to the University of Toronto and joined other resisters.

But life had a way of changing their plans for them when David was arrested for Reg’s murder. Austin believed that the police evidence was flimsy at best, so she set out to find answers. But soon she became the target of someone sending threatening letters and warning her to stop investigating.

Desolation Row was a story that intrigued me, mostly because of the times. I remember them well, being in university when young men were being drafted for the War in Vietnam that many strongly opposed. I also enjoyed recalling what life was like before technology, as Austin’s search for a pay phone on the night of the murder kept her from arriving at the church on time. And throughout her investigation, the absence of readily available phones added to the intensity.

Austin was not yet comfortable in Canada, not sure if their adopted country could ever feel like home. Especially since she had started to distrust law enforcement for rushing to judgment. By the end of the story, however, and as Austin stumbled upon various clues that led to solving the murder, she began to feel as if she could finally adjust.

I was pleased to learn that this book was the first in a series, so I’m off to find Book 2. 4.5 stars.

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5 thoughts on “REVIEW: DESOLATION ROW, BY KAY KENDALL

  1. Pingback: HUMP DAY READING: LOVING THE BOOKS! | RAINY DAYS AND MONDAYS

    1. Thanks for visiting, Kathryn, and when we didn’t have the technology, we didn’t know to miss it….but I do recall being annoyed at always having to know where the payphones were…and to have lots of quarters…LOL.

      Sue Grafton’s mysteries, set in the 80s, were also without technology.

      Like

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